Category Archives: Turkish Bay Leaf

PROBLEMS BAY LEAF

PROBLEMS BAY LEAF Leaf spots – often caused by waterlogged roots, or wet weather conditions. Plants in containers are also very prone to this, usually indicating that the compost has become old and tired. Repot your plant in spring into fresh, well-drained compost. Yellow leaves – older leaves will shed...
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CULTIVAR SELECTION OF DAPHNE

CULTIVAR SELECTION OF DAPHNE Laurus nobilis ‘Aurea’ AGM (yellow-leaved bay tree) has golden-yellow foliage Laurus nobilis AGM (bay tree) is most commonly cultivated and used for culinary purposes Laurus nobilis f. angustiolia (willow-leaved laurel) has thinner leaves than bay, but they are still edible TURKISH BAY LEAF...
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PROPAGATION OF DAPHNE

PROPAGATION OF DAPHNE Bay can be propagated from seed collected in the autumn. Remove the fleshy outer casing and sow as soon as possible. If seed has dried or is bought, soak in warm water for 24 hours before sowing. Plants may be male or female so seed is only...
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PRUNING AND TRAINING OF BAY LEAF

PRUNING AND TRAINING OF BAY LEAF Pruning and training depends on whether you have trained the bay as a topiary or are simply growing it as a shrub in the ground. Topiary-trained bay are trimmed with secateurs during summer to encourage a dense habit and to maintain a balanced shape....
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CULTIVATION NOTES OF LAUREL LEAVES

CULTIVATION NOTES OF LAUREL LEAVES Bay can be grown in a number of ways. It thrives in containers, especially if watered regularly and positioned in a sheltered spot. In the garden, bay trees grow as a large bushy shrub or small tree, reaching a height of 7.5m (23ft) or more....
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USAGE OF LAUREL LEAVES

USAGE OF LAUREL LEAVES  In classical times, bay laurel was made into wreaths to crown poets, scholars and athletes. Culinarily, the leaf is added at the beginning of cooking soups and stews and slowly imparts a deep, rich flavor. The leaf is left whole so it can be retrieved before...
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CULTURE OF LAUREL LEAVES

 CULTURE OF LAUREL LEAVES In warm climates where seed is produced, seed may take six months to a year to germinate. Wood that is just beginning to harden makes the best cuttings, but even these take up to three months to root under the best conditions. This explains why potted...
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ORIGIN OF THE BAY LEAF

ORIGIN OF THE BAY LEAF Probably Asia Minor. Today, the laurel tree grows all over the Mediterranean. Turkey is one of the main exporters. Because of its poor resistance to freezes, laurel cannot be grown outdoors in more Northern regions (except some fortunate parts of Britain, I have been told)....
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MAIN CONSTITUENTS OF BAY LEAF

  MAIN CONSTITUENTS OF BAY LEAF The essential oil from the leaves (0.8 to 3%) contains mostly 1,8 cineol (50%); furthermore, eugenol, acetyl eugenol, methyl eugenol, α- and β-pinene, phellandrene, linalool, geraniol and terpineol are found. The dried fruits contain 0.6 to 10% of essential oil, depending on provenance and...
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LAURUS NOBILIS

LAURUS NOBILIS Laurus nobilis is an evergreen Tree growing to 12 m (39ft) by 10 m (32ft) at a slow rate. It is hardy to zone 8. It is in leaf 12-Jan It is in flower from Apr to May. The flowers are dioecious (individual flowers are either male or...
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